Archive
2020, Volume 6
2019, Volume 5
2018, Volume 4
2017, Volume 3
2016, Volume 2
2015, Volume 1




Volume 6, Issue 2, December 2020, Page: 26-30
Conductive Hearing Loss with an Intact Tympanic Membrane: Diagnosed Approaches
Sana Mallouk, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Sara Halily, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Yasser Hammouda, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Youssef Oukessou, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Sami Rouadi, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Reda Abada, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Mohamed Mahtar, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Mohamed Roubal, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, King Hassan II University Hospital, Casablanca, Morocco
Received: Aug. 5, 2020;       Accepted: Aug. 17, 2020;       Published: Sep. 16, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijo.20200602.12      View  59      Downloads  44
Abstract
Objective: Our study aims to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, radiological, and etiological aspects of this disease. Methods: We reviewed data from patients who consulted the same seigneur for hearing loss and in whom the otoscopic examination was normal with a conductive hearing loss objectively confirmed on tonal audiometry, for a period of one year (from October 2018 to October 2019). Epidemiological, clinical and paraclinical data were collected and recorded on-farm records. Results: The average age is 36 years. The M/F sex ratio was 1.5 in favor of the men. None of our patients reported a personal otologic history. Three patients reported a notion of head trauma and a similar case in the family was found in four patients. Hearing loss is the most frequent reason for consultation. Otoscopic examination shows a normal tympanic membrane without perforation in all patients. CT scan of the temporal bone was performed in all patients (100%); it was normal in 4 cases (17%), which required surgical exploration. However, he showed images of otosclerosis in 15 cases (65%), an image of congenital cholesteatoma in a single patient, tympanic glomus in a single patient, an incudo-malleolar dislocation in a single patient (4.5%), and an incudo-stapedial dislocation in a single patient (4.5%). Conclusion: Conductive hearing loss (CHL) is a diagnostic challenge for the physician that requires a schematic approach. The diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical and paraclinical arguments.
Keywords
Conductive Hearing Loss, Intact Tympanic Membrane, Otoscopic Examination, CT Scan of Temporal Bone
To cite this article
Sana Mallouk, Sara Halily, Yasser Hammouda, Youssef Oukessou, Sami Rouadi, Reda Abada, Mohamed Mahtar, Mohamed Roubal, Conductive Hearing Loss with an Intact Tympanic Membrane: Diagnosed Approaches, International Journal of Otorhinolaryngology. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2020, pp. 26-30. doi: 10.11648/j.ijo.20200602.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Espitalier F, Durand N, Boyer J, Gayet-Delacroix M, Malard O, Bordure P. Stratégie diagnostique devant une surdité de l'adulte. EMC (Elsevier Masson SAS), Oto-rhino laryngologie. 2012; 7 (2): 1–12.
[2]
Subramanian, M., Chawla, A., Chokkappan, K., Lim, T., Shenoy, J. N., & Chin Guan Peh, W. (2018). High-Resolution Computed Tomography Imaging in Conductive Hearing Loss: What to Look for? Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology, 47 (2), 119–124.
[3]
Curtin, H. D. (2016). Imaging of Conductive Hearing Loss With a Normal Tympanic Membrane. American Journal of Roentgenology, 206 (1), 49–56.
[4]
Kim SH, Cho YS, Kim HJ, Kim HJ. Operative findings of conductive hearing loss with intact tympanic membrane and normal temporal bone computed tomography. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2014; 271: 1409–14.
[5]
Thomeer HG, Kunst HP, Cremers CW. Congenital stapes ankylosis associated with another ossicular chain anomaly: surgical results in 30 ears. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2011; 137: 935–41.
[6]
Lippy WH, Berenholz LP. Pearls on otosclerosis and stapedectomy. Ear Nose Throat J. 2008; 326-328.
[7]
Thomassin JM, Collin M, Bailhache A, Dessi P, Rodriguez F, Varoquaux A. Otospongiose. EMC (Elsevier Masson SAS), Oto-rhino-laryngologie. 2010: 1–15. 20-195-A-10.
[8]
Terzi S, Ozgur A, Erdivanli OC, Coskun ZO, Ogurlu M, Demirci M, et al. Diagnostic value of the wideband acoustic absorbance test in middle-ear effusion. J Laryngol Otol 2015; 129: 1078–84.
[9]
Feeney MP, Grant IL, Marryott LP. Wideband energy reflectance measurements in adults with middle-ear disorders. J Speech Lang Hear Res 2003; 46: 901–11.
[10]
Kim, S. Y., Han, J. J., Oh, S. H., Lee, J. H., Suh, M., Kim, M. H., & Park, M. K. (2018). Differentiating among conductive hearing loss conditions with wideband tympanometry. Auris Nasus Larynx.
[11]
Kreitmayer, C., Marcrum, S. C., Picou, E. M., Steffens, T., & Kummer, P. (2019). Subclinical Conductive Hearing Loss Significantly Reduces Otoacoustic Emission Amplitude: Implications for Test Performance. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology.
[12]
Virk JS, Singh A, Lingam RK. The role of imaging in the diagnosis and management of otosclerosis. Otol Neurotol. 2013; 34 (7): e55-e60.
[13]
Goodhill V, Haris I, Canalis R. Otosclerosis. In: Canalis R, Lambert PR, eds. The Ear: Comprehensive Otology. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkens; 2000: 467-487.
[14]
Wolfovitz, A., & Luntz, M. (2018). Impact of Imaging in Management of Otosclerosis. Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, 51 (2), 343–355.
[15]
Bonafé A, Laval C, Arru Ph, Manelfe C, Temporal bone fractures. Rivista di Neuroradiologia, 1995; 8: 847-54.
[16]
Brodie HA, Thompson TC. Management of complications from 820 temporal bone fractures. Am J Otol 1997; 18: 188–97.
[17]
Juliano AF, Ginat DT, Moonis G. Imaging review of the temporal bone: Part II. Traumatic, postoperative, and noninflammatory nonneoplastic conditions. Radiology 2015; 276: 655–72.
[18]
Stephan LA, Isaacson JE. Incudomallear joint separation. Am J Otol 2000; 21: 284-5.
[19]
Yetiser, S., Hıdır, Y., Birkent, H., Satar, B., & Durmaz, A. (2008). Traumatic ossicular dislocations: etiology and management. American Journal of Otolaryngology, 29 (1), 31–36.
[20]
Carlson ML, Sweeney AD, Pelosi S, et al. Surgical management of glomus tympanicum: a review of 115 cases over four decades. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2015; 152: 136–42.
[21]
Kojima H, Tanaka Y, Shiwa M. et al. Congenital cholesteatoma clinical features and surgical results. Am J Otolaryngol. 2006; 27 (5): 299–305.
[22]
Bennett M, Warren F, Jackson G, Kaylie D (2006) Congenital cholesteatoma: theories, facts, and 53 patients. Otolaryngol Clin N Am 39: 1081–1094.
[23]
Minor LB. Clinical manifestations of superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Laryngoscope 2005; 115 (10): 1717–1727.
[24]
Li PM, Bergeron C, Monfared A, Agrawal S, Blevins NH. Superior semicircular canal dehiscence diagnosed after failed stapedotomy for conductive hearing loss. Am J Otolaryngol 2011; 32: 441–4.
[25]
Yang, F., & Liu, Y. (2018). Reporting and Description for Congenital Middle Ear Malformations to Facilitate Surgical Management. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology, 000348941879293.
Browse journals by subject